Office 365 Developer Review from Microsoft Ignite

Companion Article for the Overview at the Boston Office 365 Developer Bootcamp

This article could be useful to any Office 365 developer who wants a quick reference to¬† the recorded sessions from Microsoft Ignite, but it’s also intended as a companion to my opening talk at the Office 365 Developer Bootcamp on October 27, 2017, in Burlington, MA. The talk is intended to show you all the ways you can develop for Office 365. Office 365 includes the Office client programs, such as Word, Excel, and Outlook, as well as the online services, such as Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, etc.

There was a ton of great content at Ignite on Office development and, thankfully, most of it is available online. Here are links to the sessions that are available as recordings, so you can dive into whatever areas you like.

Continue reading

Office Developer Bootcamp Sponsors on Board

Some readers may already know that Scot Hillier and I are presenting an Office Developer Bootcamp focused on the SharePoint Framework on Friday, October 27, 2017 at the Microsoft office in Burlington MA. This is a great opportunity to learn SharePoint Framework development, including related technologies, Typescript, WebPack, and React. There are still openings, and it’s free!¬†Please register here to join us!

I’m pleased to announce that we have some great sponsors for this event. Not only will they ensure that attendees are well fed, they were hand-picked as they bring key technologies that every SharePoint developer should know about!

Continue reading

Building Compliant Team Sites

Companion article to my session at Microsoft Ignite 2017

Thanks to everyone who attended my session at Microsoft Ignite 2017, Building Compliant Team sites (THR2057). For those who missed it, here is the recording. This article provides links to resources and additional details.

The talk was about how enterprises can manage modern SharePoint team sites in a way that makes compliance easy.

Continue reading

Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

This is the one of my lessons learned from the Shire Hub Intranet project, based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions
    (this article)

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

Continue reading

Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

This is the one of my lessons learned from the Shire Hub Intranet project, based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
    (this article)
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

Continue reading

Previewing and Opening Office Files from the SharePoint Framework

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

SPShire

I’m thrilled to be part of an early adopter project building a new intranet for Shire Pharmaceuticals based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites. Shire is an exciting and innovative company, and the team includes a number of my fellow Microsoft MVP’s as well as teammates from BlueMetal. Last week Microsoft broadcast a webinar from the Boston MTC featuring a cross-section of the development team. Microsoft’s Mark Kashman promised we’d post some of the lessons learned in the project, and this is one of those postings.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
    (this article)
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

Continue reading

Porting REST calls to SharePoint Framework

The SharePoint Framework (SPFx) is a powerful technology for developing web parts that run on both classic and modern SharePoint pages. SPFx is 100% client-side, and it’s often possible to reuse client-side JavaScript (from Script Editor or Content Editor Web Parts) in SPFx. This is usually straight forward if the original JavaScript targeted a single HTML element, since SPFx does the same thing: it hands you an HTML element and you inject your web part in there.

I was recently porting a JavaScript widget to SPFx and it all came over more or less as expected, except that the REST calls to SharePoint failed. All of them. Failed. Miserably. This article will show you the fix.

Continue reading

Calling SharePoint CSOM from Azure Functions (Part 3)

Now that a skeleton the Azure function is written and registered in Azure Active Directory, it’s time to add code to call the SharePoint Online Client-Side Object Model (CSOM). Much of CSOM is generated from SharePoint’s server-side API, making it by far the most complete API for SharePoint Online.

In this article you will complete a simple example of calling CSOM from an Azure Function. The completed code is in a gist here.

Continue reading

Calling SharePoint CSOM from Azure Functions (Part 2)

This article will show you how to register an Azure Function as an application in Azure Active Directory so you can call other web services under the application’s identity. This allows you to securely authenticate the Azure Function, and to elevate permissions (i.e. the Azure Function can do things that its caller doesn’t have permission to do.) You can think of this as the cloud equivalent of a service account: it’s an identity that represents an application instead of a person.

Continue reading

Calling SharePoint CSOM from Azure Functions (Part 1)

In old-school SharePoint, if you wanted to run some custom code in a web part, workflow, form, or event handler, you wrote either a sandboxed or a farm solution. Neither of these are supported in SharePoint Online. So what are developers supposed to do when they need to run some code somewhere other than the web browser? How can they run code in the background, elevate permissions, or fill gaps in the “out of the box” configuration options?

The modern answer is Azure Functions. It’s a much better sandbox than SharePoint used to have, yet, like a sandboxed solution, you don’t have to worry about where to put it. Just choose what will trigger your function, such as a web service request, web hook, Service Bus message, or a time schedule. Then pop in your code and you’re good to go. They call it “serverless” computing, but there are servers somewhere! You just don’t need to worry about it.

Continue reading