Provisioning Teams with Azure Functions and Microsoft Flow Part 4: Looking at the Code

This is the last article in a blog series explaining a new open source solution (located here) for provisioning Microsoft Teams. The solution is based on Azure Functions which communicate with Microsoft Flow (or really anything) using Azure queues. This allows a Flow, PowerApps, or Logic Apps developer to use whatever logic they wish and, when a Team is to be created, queue a message to an Azure Function which will do the work.

This is Part 4 of the series, which reviews some key areas of the Azure Functions code as well as the Azure Resource Manager (ARM) Template which provisions it.

  1. Solution Overview
  2. Installing the solution
  3. Building a Flow for the solution
  4. Looking at the code (this post)

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Provisioning Teams with Azure Functions and Microsoft Flow Part 3: Writing the Flow

This is part of a blog series explaining a new open source solution (located here) for provisioning Microsoft Teams. The solution is based on Azure Functions which communicate with Microsoft Flow (or really anything) using Azure queues. This allows a Flow, PowerApps, or Logic Apps developer to use whatever logic they wish and, when a Team is to be created, queue a message to an Azure Function which will do the work.

This is Part 3 of the series:

  1. Solution Overview
  2. Installing the solution
  3. Building a Flow for the solution (this post)
  4. Looking at the code

Continue reading

Provisioning Teams with Azure Functions and Microsoft Flow Part 2: Installation

This is part of a blog series explaining a new open source solution (located here) for provisioning Microsoft Teams. The solution is based on Azure Functions which communicate with Microsoft Flow (or really anything) using Azure queues. This allows a Flow, PowerApps, or Logic Apps developer to use whatever logic they wish and, when a Team is to be created, queue a message to an Azure Function which will do the work.

This is Part 2 of the series:

  1. Solution Overview
  2. Installing the solution (this post)
  3. Building a Flow for the solution
  4. Looking at the code

Continue reading

Provisioning Teams with Azure Functions and Microsoft Flow Part 1: Solution Overview

Today I’m happy to share a new open source solution (located here) I’ve been working on for provisioning Microsoft Teams. The solution is based on Azure Functions which communicate with Microsoft Flow (or really anything) using Azure queues. This allows a Flow, PowerApps, or Logic Apps developer to use whatever logic they wish and, when a Team is to be created, queue a message to an Azure Function which will do the work.

This is Part 1 of a four-part series:

  1. Solution Overview (this post)
  2. Installing the solution
  3. Building a Flow for the solution
  4. Looking at the code

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Idempotent Site Scripts for SharePoint

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Image by geralt on Pixabay

As you probably are aware, SharePoint site scripts are used to set up content and settings in SharePoint sites. They’re applied using site designs, which allow the same script to be reused with different names and permissions. Site designs can be applied when a site is created, when it’s added to a hub site, or on demand via PowerShell or the SharePoint UI.

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Calling Microsoft Graph from a single-page application: Part 2

This post was part of the “30 Days Microsoft Graph” blog series, now cross-posted to my personal blog. I was thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to this excellent blog series. Many thanks to Brian Jackett, who organized this excellent blog series, and to Srinivas Varukala, who kindly edited my articles. In addition, thanks to others from the Graph and Azure AD teams who helped to test and QA the articles.

In Part 1 you learned how to register apps for both Azure AD v1 and v2 that can be used from the browser to enable Graph API calls. Today, we’ll use those registrations in some simple applications.

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Calling Microsoft Graph from a single-page application: Part 1

This post was part of the “30 Days Microsoft Graph” blog series, now cross-posted to my personal blog. I was thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to this excellent blog series. Many thanks to Brian Jackett, who organized 30 Days Microsoft Graph, and to Srinivas Varukala, who kindly edited my articles. In addition, thanks to others from the Graph and Azure AD teams who helped to test and QA the articles.

In this article and the next, you’ll learn how to call Microsoft Graph APIs directly from a web browser in a Single Page Application much the same way that the Day 15 article showed how to call Graph from a .Net Core Console Application. This article will walk you through updating your app registrations (for v1 and v2) so they’ll work from the browser; in Part 2 we’ll dig into the code.


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Branding SharePoint: The New Normal

Modern SharePoint is catching on, and sites are looking better than ever right out of the box. With mobile-ready pages and easier editing, customers and partners are starting to ask for it. And as SharePoint 2019 brings the modern experience on premises, the demand is likely to grow even more.

Yet even as sites look better than ever “out of the box”, there are constraints on how they can be customized. Partners and customers who want to completely change the look sometimes run into these boundaries and get frustrated.

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Building SharePoint Site Designs with Themes and Azure Functions

This article is the sequel to Swooping into SharePoint Site Designs, in which I related my experience working behind the scenes on the world’s first SharePoint reality show! This time I’ll explain the code so you can build similar solutions if you so desire.

The sample shows how to build a site design and script for a simple department site, as created in the SharePoint Swoop video. A team of experts worked to redesign an Intranet site in just three days. This site design was developed behind the scenes to provide a template for all the company’s department sites.

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Swooping into Site Designs

A few months ago a group of SharePoint MVPs gathered to film a new kind of reality TV show and remake a company’s Intranet. You may have seen it – SharePoint Swoop!

This is a story from behind the scenes,in which I got to make their work reusable with SharePoint Site Designs and Scripts. It was quite a thrill to be involved, even though I wasn’t there in person! I’ll start with the story, then dig into the details of Site Designs and Scripts.

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