Securely erase physical drives with dban and Hyper-V

I’m writing this between jobs – I’ve left BlueMetal, and haven’t started at Microsoft yet. I’m using this time to do a deep clean on my home office, and I’ve come across a number of hard drives that need disposal. But how to do so securely, so data can’t be recovered? And how can I hit a budget goal of, say, zero?

This article from ZDNet offers three options: one software (Darik’s Boot and Nuke – dban), one hardware (Wiebetech’s Drive eRazer Ultra), and one brute force (drive a nail through the platters). The hardware solution would be perfect if I did this every week, but it’s kind of expensive and this isn’t something I’ll use very often. The brute force solution might be good if I had a lot of pent up aggression, but it physically destroys the drive. That leaves the software approach, and a bunch of people recommended dban. But they recommend running it on a dedicated machine because by default it wipes out all connected hard drives and it’s easy to accidentally wipe out everything.

So I had the idea of using Hyper-V, my favorite virtualization tool that’s built into Windows 10 (Enterprise, Professional, or Education editions). Virtualization provides a safe sandbox to run dban, and I can run it in the background on my existing PC.

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Office 365 Developer Review from Microsoft Ignite

Companion Article for the Overview at the Boston Office 365 Developer Bootcamp

This article could be useful to any Office 365 developer who wants a quick reference to¬† the recorded sessions from Microsoft Ignite, but it’s also intended as a companion to my opening talk at the Office 365 Developer Bootcamp on October 27, 2017, in Burlington, MA. The talk is intended to show you all the ways you can develop for Office 365. Office 365 includes the Office client programs, such as Word, Excel, and Outlook, as well as the online services, such as Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, etc.

There was a ton of great content at Ignite on Office development and, thankfully, most of it is available online. Here are links to the sessions that are available as recordings, so you can dive into whatever areas you like.

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Building Compliant Team Sites

Companion article to my session at Microsoft Ignite 2017

Thanks to everyone who attended my session at Microsoft Ignite 2017, Building Compliant Team sites (THR2057). For those who missed it, here is the recording. This article provides links to resources and additional details.

The talk was about how enterprises can manage modern SharePoint team sites in a way that makes compliance easy.

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Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

This is the one of my lessons learned from the Shire Hub Intranet project, based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions
    (this article)

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

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Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

This is the one of my lessons learned from the Shire Hub Intranet project, based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
    (this article)
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

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Previewing and Opening Office Files from the SharePoint Framework

Lessons Learned from the #SPShire Project

SPShire

I’m thrilled to be part of an early adopter project building a new intranet for Shire Pharmaceuticals based on the forthcoming SharePoint Communication Sites. Shire is an exciting and innovative company, and the team includes a number of my fellow Microsoft MVP’s as well as teammates from BlueMetal. Last week Microsoft broadcast a webinar from the Boston MTC featuring a cross-section of the development team. Microsoft’s Mark Kashman promised we’d post some of the lessons learned in the project, and this is one of those postings.

The lessons in this blog series are:

  1. Previewing and Opening Office Documents from the SharePoint Framework
    (this article)
  2. Using the OneDrive File Picker in SharePoint Framework Solutions
  3. Creating Reusable React Components for SharePoint Framework Solutions

This project on github contains the sample solution for all three articles.

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Porting REST calls to SharePoint Framework

The SharePoint Framework (SPFx) is a powerful technology for developing web parts that run on both classic and modern SharePoint pages. SPFx is 100% client-side, and it’s often possible to reuse client-side JavaScript (from Script Editor or Content Editor Web Parts) in SPFx. This is usually straight forward if the original JavaScript targeted a single HTML element, since SPFx does the same thing: it hands you an HTML element and you inject your web part in there.

I was recently porting a JavaScript widget to SPFx and it all came over more or less as expected, except that the REST calls to SharePoint failed. All of them. Failed. Miserably. This article will show you the fix.

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Calling SharePoint CSOM from Azure Functions (Part 1)

In old-school SharePoint, if you wanted to run some custom code in a web part, workflow, form, or event handler, you wrote either a sandboxed or a farm solution. Neither of these are supported in SharePoint Online. So what are developers supposed to do when they need to run some code somewhere other than the web browser? How can they run code in the background, elevate permissions, or fill gaps in the “out of the box” configuration options?

The modern answer is Azure Functions. It’s a much better sandbox than SharePoint used to have, yet, like a sandboxed solution, you don’t have to worry about where to put it. Just choose what will trigger your function, such as a web service request, web hook, Service Bus message, or a time schedule. Then pop in your code and you’re good to go. They call it “serverless” computing, but there are servers somewhere! You just don’t need to worry about it.

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